Pupil Premium funding at Waterfoot Primary


What is the Pupil Premium?

Schools are allocated a sum of money called the Pupil Premium to support children who require additional help with their work. The allocation is calculated according to the intake of the school and it is important that we decide how best to use the money to enable all children to succeed.

Waterfoot Primary School currently has 58 pupils eligible for the Pupil Premium funding. Our pupil premium grant allocation until 31st March is £49,280.

What are the main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible pupils at your school?

  • Speech and language difficulties.
  • Issues around attendance, lateness and parental engagement.
  • Reading progress.
  • Emotional difficulties and feelings of low self-esteem.

How are we spending the pupil premium to address the main barriers to educational achievement.

We have decided to use this money to pay for or contribute to the following:

  • Additional Teaching Assistant support in classes to allow for specific interventions.
  • Teaching Assistant support for reading using the “Better Reading Partnership” scheme.
  • The continuation and enlargement of our “Home from Home” scheme to provide extra support for disadvantaged pupils outside normal school hours.
  • Counselling support
  • Small group extension teaching.
  • Helping certain pupils have access to activities or resources that they might otherwise not have including:
    • Extra-Curriculum activities.
    • Year 6 Residential Holiday
    • Breakfast Club
    • WASPS club support
    • School Trips subsidy
  • Maintenance of a single EYFS unit rather than split year group classes
  • Extra-teaching provision in Upper Key Stage 2.
  • A Music Scholarship
  • Provision further reading support in KS1.
  • Mathematics intervention in Lower Key Stage Two - “1st Class at Number”

What is your rationale for the use of the funding at Waterfoot Primary?

At Waterfoot we think that the Pupil Premium should support children’s learning across the curriculum. Although it is primarily used for intervention work in reading, writing and maths, we also use the funding to provide wider experiences and support which prepare children for learning. Such support might be ensuring that the child involved can attend a residential trip, receive extra counselling or play the violin. In essence, we assess our children’s needs and try to make sure they have the best chance they can to succeed.

In the previous academic year we spent the pupil premium allocation on:

  • Additional Teaching Assistant support in classes to allow for specific interventions.
  • Teaching Assistant support for reading using the “Better Reading Partnership” scheme.
  • The creation of a “Home from Home” scheme to provide extra support for disadvantage pupils outside normal school hours.
  • Counselling support
  • Small group extension teaching with the SENDCO (Special Educational Needs and Disability Coordinator).
  • Helping certain pupils have access to activities or resources that they might otherwise not have including:
    • Extra-Curriculum activities such as Dodge Ball and Archery.
    • Year 6 Residential Holiday
    • Breakfast Club
    • WASPS club support
    • School Trips subsidy
  • Maintenance of a single EYFS unit rather than split year group classes
  • Extra-teaching provision in Upper Key Stage 2.
  • A Music Scholarship
  • Provision further reading support in KS1
  • Mathematics intervention in Lower Key Stage Two - “1st Class at Number”
  • Mathematics intervention in Key Stage One
  • Writing intervention in Key Stage One
  • Phonics Intervention in Key Stage One

How effective do we think we are in using the funding we receive?

One of the key ways in which the Government (via Ofsted) assesses the effectiveness of Pupil Premium funding is through how well pupils perform in statutory testing, particularly the National Curriculum tests for reading, writing and maths at the end of Year 6. In both 2014 and 2015 Ofsted identified the progress of pupils in receipt of the Pupil Premium as strength of the school. In 2016, the first year with the new national assessments, the progress of pupils receiving the Pupil Premium in reading was lower than the national average, but slightly higher for writing and mathematics. This has now become a key priority for the school.

The effectiveness of the Pupil Premium can, and should, be considered in a wider sense. It can be more difficult in these cases (for example counselling or extra-curriculum activity support) to provide metrics of success and effectiveness. That said, although the full impact of these initiatives may take longer to come to fruition, we do believe they are of value and continue to support them.

Overall, we believe Waterfoot Primary School continues to use its Pupil Premium funding effectively and that the funding enhances the learning of the children who are eligible for it.


Last updated: Wednesday, Friday, 3 March 2017. Next review April 2017